We are turning our roof into an unvented roof assembly by raising the roof and blowing in SPF. We are planning to leave the existing vapor barrier down but remove the fiberglass batting and then adding 6" of SPF in all the cavities, to completely seal and insulate the house. Should we have any concerns about doing it "upside down" and not spraying the foam directly to the underside/sheathing of the roof?

Spray Foam Under House


One of the high-tech insulation products being utilized these days is a foam-spray product called "Icynene," which is a foam that starts as two liquid components (a and b, if you will) that are heated up and sent through two hoses and meet at a tip of a gun where the magic begins. This is a thin film that expands to 100 times its volume in eight seconds, when it's permanently set up.

SPF insulation applied by professionals is usually described as either a high- or low-pressure foam and is available as either open- or closed-cell. Each type has advantages and disadvantages depending on the application requirements. The comparison chart below can be helpful in explaining or understanding which type of SPF insulation is best suited to a specific application.

I have to insulate my walls at the end of this week. That does not give me time to procure slow-rise foam, so my stud cavities will be filled with foam before I'm ready to fill the corner voids. I will not be able to drill straight through the corner studs. Instead, I will have to remove material where the studs meet. What sort of tool do you envisioning me holding while I create space to pump foam into my 1972 corner voids?
Warning: EnergyGuard™ Elastomeric Roof Coatings can freeze below 32° F. This is because the product is water based. In case of freezing temperatures, stop the application process. After application, you must allow the product time to dry before exposing the elastomeric roof coating to foot traffic or water. You should also cover the containers and dispose them responsibly after application. In case you or someone else i.e. a child ingests the coating seek immediate medical attention. Don't induce vomiting.
We are turning our roof into an unvented roof assembly by raising the roof and blowing in SPF. We are planning to leave the existing vapor barrier down but remove the fiberglass batting and then adding 6" of SPF in all the cavities, to completely seal and insulate the house. Should we have any concerns about doing it "upside down" and not spraying the foam directly to the underside/sheathing of the roof?

Spray Foam Under House


Simple – we’ve seen experienced contractors work with the separate nitrogen tanks and spray foam rigs and have one heck of a time. These spray foam insulation kits are quick to learn and simple to use. They’re designed to be easy so you get results the very first time you spray. Thorough Instructions, 24/7 Product Support, and videos make it easy to install.
“It’s been scientifically proven that the temp of the shingles rises only a couple of degrees when there is an unvented attic compared to a vented attic,” said Garry Barlow, estimator at RetroFoam of Michigan. “If we lived in a southern state it has been proven that the longevity of the shingle did diminish by only one year. In the northern states there was no difference in the life span of the shingles.”
Was hesitant to buy this product because of some of the reviews but glad I did. It does just what it says and we even got the square footage out of it. You just need to read ALL the directions first and it wouldn't hurt to read some of the helpful hints in some of the reviews. It does only cover 1 inch at 600 square feet and is extremely easy to apply. Very satisfied customer!
You probably have some familiarity with spray foam insulation, and you may have even used the foam that comes in pressured spray cans at home improvement retailers. This foam is know as one-part foam, meaning that it is one continuous mixture that is simply applied to the area in need. One-part foam is frequently used for sealing small gaps and cracks.
Allison--would be very interested in your take on the GHG issues of foams, which have received lots of smart commentary recently. To highlight a few: architect Jesse Thompson's comments on Tom's Good vs Bad post on Energy Circle, the very thorough piece by Alex Wilson on Green Building Advisor and Michael Anschel's cautionary diatribe on Remodeling. 

We live in middle TN and had our house foamed last year. We noticed recently that some of the foam was shrinking and seperating from the floor joists. We contacted the installer and he informed us that the manufacturer had a problem with a batch of foam during the time frame we had our house sprayed. The contractor wasn't sure if we had the recalled batch installed in our house or not. He said he would check the batch numbers and let us know. He seems like a nice guy promising to do whatever it takes to fix any problems. Do we trust him, however, to be truthful about the batch number? Do we have any options for finding out the information ourselves? I inspected the entire crawl space of the house and noticed approximately (5) areas that were seperating and a couple areas where the foam didn't adhere to the block. Do I assume by it being so infrequent that it is nothing to be concerned about? My concern is the walls that are not capable of being visually inspected because of sheetrock.

Closed-cell (aka two-pound foam) is denser than open-cell at about 2 pounds per cubic foot. Its R-Value is between 6-6.5 per inch. As a result, this kind of foam is much more expensive than its counterpart. The reason closed-cell doesn't need a vapor retarder is because it already has one. It's permeance is 0.8 perm, which means it can handle cold climates without the use of an additional board or drywall. Closed-cell uses hydroflurocarbons (HFCs) as part of its makeup. However, this material has been known to have a high global warming effect. If you want a green insulation solution, this is not the material to use. A way to avoid this and still use closed-cell is by installing it alongside fiberglass batts. http://www.youtube.com/embed/ggLAUsiuI_o
Thoroughly clean the roof surface. Roofs collect oils from asphalt, chimneys, and cars plus lots of dirt and dust. Coatings don’t stick well to any of these. We recommend cleaning with an inexpensive solution of TSP or TSP Substitute in a bucket of water (follow label instructions). Use a broom to scrub ponding areas and areas of peeling coatings. Work a section at a time and hose off the dirty water. Sweep away puddles to promote drying. Do not allow wash water to dry on walls, furniture, windows, and visible surfaces. 
If your foam pulled away just a little bit, Jamie, and they were able to fix it with just a little bit of touching up, then it wasn't as bad as the house where I saw this problem. As the last photo above shows, it had pulled away significantly from the studs and rafters, and it was all over the house. This was closed cell foam, and interestingly, it didn't pull away from the horizontal framing members, just the vertical and sloped ones. They did some touch up, but that wasn't enough. I don't know how this one ended up getting resolved. I think maybe the contractor came back and sprayed cellulose on top of the foam.

How Much Is Spray Foam Insulation A Square Foot


Both high and low-pressure, two-component spray foam are applied by professional contractors who are trained to use and apply SPF with the required equipment (protective gear, full eye protection, respirators, and gloves). Contractors should follow the ventilation recommendations by the product manufacturer to avoid overexposure through inhalation, and instruct those without protective gear (homeowners or building occupants) to stay away from the work area during exposure times and to not return until instructed by the professional contractor.
That’s $58.3 Billion dollars. That’s roughly how much money we wasted in 2010 in the US according to the Department of Energy because of air leaking out of our building envelopes. If your building leaks energy, you’re paying more for energy than you need to. Clearly you’re not alone. If you’re ready to claim your share of the savings, it’s quicker and easier than you think.
Note:  A board foot is defined as a 12" x 12" square at 1" thick. Actual output can be affected by a number of factors including temperature and humidity. The theoretical yield has become an industry standard for identifying certain sizes of two component kits. Theoretical yield calculations are performed in perfect laboratory conditions, without taking into account the loss of blowing agent or the variations in application methods and types. https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ggLAUsiuI_o
While coatings may potentially stop minor leaks, the roof should be properly repaired and dried prior to coating application. Coatings may be able to seal pinhole leaks, which are leaks not visible to the naked eye. If the roof is leaking, the roof leak will need to be identified and repaired prior to any recoating; do not expect the coating to find and seal the leaks.

Current guidelines recommend up to 10 inches of insulation in your attic . This is usually added to the ground, rather than the roof line, which results in the loss of your storage area, due to not being able to refit floor boards after installation. By implementing spray foam insulation to the roof line, you regain the lost 10 inches, thus increasing storage, height and practicality.

Low-pressure spray polyurethane foam is typically applied around ductwork, electrical or piping penetrations, rim joists and roof repairs. This type of foam is used to insulate and seal small to mid-sized areas in homes and other buildings that are too large or extensive for smaller, insulating foam sealants. It is especially effective in weatherizing older homes that have many cracks, gaps and wall penetrations around doors, window frames, pipes and plumbing lines. The air- and heat-leakage improvements can be quite dramatic after a low-pressure SPF application, which can result in greater efficiencies.
Sean, thanks for jumping in and answering John's questions. About choosing the right foam, I intentionally avoided the open cell vs. closed cell foam debate. I did this partly because it's worthy of an article all by itself, but mainly I didn't include it because, despite all the warnings the two sides issue about the other, I've never personally seen a problem caused by using open cell where they should've used closed cell or vice versa. I'm sure things like that happen; I just haven't seen it yet.

Spray Foam Attic Insulation


This high R-value of 4.45 at 1 inch, polyurethane insulation expands to seal cracks, gaps, and voids in attics, walls, crawl spaces, and ceilings. Agribalance is a three-quarter pound density foam that reduces air leakage by improving energy efficiency, and reducing moisture intrusion and outside contaminants such as dust, dirt, and allergens. As a result, builders can generally install smaller, more energy-efficient HVAC systems and achieve similar, or superior comfort compared to traditionally insulated structures which require a larger, less efficient HVAC system – resulting in higher energy costs.
Loctite TITE FOAM Window and Door is a Loctite TITE FOAM Window and Door is a new generation of polyurethane-based insulating foam sealant that expands to fill seal and insulate around window and door jambs. Loctite TITE FOAM is a minimal-expanding foam based on purified and concentrated ingredients that provides four times more density versus conventional window and ...  More + Product Details Close http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o
Heat which is created elsewhere that is transported by means of a fluid, such as water or in our case air. Spray foam insulation's most important attribute is the ability to air seal creating a custom airtight envelope within the building structure. The added benefit to air sealing is the ability to block convective heat transfer from interior to exterior during heating months and vice versa during cooling months, as the heat cannot escape through gaps in the buildings envelope without the aid of air movement from infiltration as a means of transport.
This tropic heat actually is the cause that the steel structure, which most roofs in that part of the world are built on, expands and contracts all the time. By doing so, the sun-battered steel structure causes the roof tiles to dislodge and slowly creates small openings between the roof tiles, through which rain water can run into, creating leaks that can cause much damage to plastered ceilings and electric wiring.
Note: The practice of foam insulating the attic has raised eyebrows in the building industry because "standard" roofing techniques call for the attic to be ventilated; however, in a vented attic situation it will become approximately 130 degrees in the summer. There's no reason for an air-conditioning and vent-ductwork to have to work in that type of severe conditions. By applying Icynene right on the underside of the roof deck, the severe temperatures no longer exist in the attic. In short, the attic is now a "conditioned" space of the house that is just as comfortable as any other room in the home. This is called a "Compact Roof", which means you can frame right up against it. The one drawback of using expanded foam on the inside of the roof is that this will cause the temperature of the shingles to rise, but how much is not yet known. And how much damage a rise in temperatures could cause is debatable.

Whether you’re sending something fragile in the mail or keeping valuables safe during a move, secure packing is everything. To protect a delicate item, simply fill a spare shopping bag half-full with spray insulation foam and place in the bottom of a box, pressing the item gently into the bag as it hardens to cushion the item. Repeat for the top and you have a DIY custom packaging solution that can handle the rigors of delivery.

Spray Foam


Builders often turn to high-density SPF when high insulation values and strength are needed. As its name implies, this foam has a denser structure than either of the other SPF types. Therefore, it does not expand as much as lower density foams and requires more material to cover and insulate any given space. This spray foam is often an excellent choice for roofing or other exterior insulation because of its seamless, monolithic nature. High-density SPF can also help reduce energy costs significantly over a roof’s lifetime due to its thermal resistance properties. It also offers increased protection against air and water infiltration and strengthens the structure to which it is applied. The bond that SPF forms to the roof can increase a building’s resistance to wind uplift, which can help reduce damage experienced during periods of high wind. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o&feature=kp


With constant exposure to heat, cold, UV radiation, rain, snow, hail, high winds and possible mechanical damage, a roof can be the most vulnerable component of a building’s exterior. However, a roof’s long-term performance can be enhanced — and major roofing problems avoided — with correct design, quality materials, proper installation and workmanship, and comprehensive care.

How Much To Spray Foam Crawl Space

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