Starting a new build (1 1/2 basement walkout), all 2x6 exterior walls w/ brick veneer in CZ3. Above grade, would like to do spray foam in 2x6 walls, 1/2" or 1" of rigid foam board on the exterior, and a 1" air gap. Will this require a house wrap or can I do w/o the rigid foam and go with a housewrap? Also, any recommendations about insulation strategies for the finished basement. Thanks! http://youtube.com/e/ggLAUsiuI_o
R-value, the thermal resistance measure of insulation, varies between all insulation products whether they are fiberglass, cellulose, open-cell spray foam insulation or closed-cell sprayed-in foam insulation. Generally speaking the rule of thumb is the higher the R-value, the greater the insulating power.  Focusing on spray foam insulation materials, there is a difference between the two main types. According to industry publication, Fine Home Building, the R-value for open-cell spray foam is between R-3.5 – R-3.6 per inch. However, there are open-cell spray foam insulation products actually offer R-3.7 per inch such as Icynene Classic and Icynene Classic Max. The open cell structure of low density foam insulation means the R-value is lower than its closed-cell counterpart. Nevertheless, open-cell spray foam does offer superior and consistent thermal insulation and air sealing properties.
Sealection 500 is a cutting-edge formula of open-cell spray foam insulation, which expands 120 times its liquid volume to insulate and seal all cracks, gaps, and joints with a single application, and is easy to install and finish. It has dramatically increased energy efficiency for millions of residential and commercial property owners. This translates to a high-performing product for builders, shorter application, and finishing times for contractors, and lower energy bills for homeowners and commercial building owners. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o&app=desktop

I am building a house in Central Texas (Caldwell). Several builders are cautious about using foam insulation and/or a closed attic. I would like to use both. Here in Texas, heat and humidity (except for the past few years of drought) are a continuing problem. Which type of foam would be the best to use in our home, where should the vapor barrier be or should be use one at all, if we are using fans in the exterior walls to supply fresh air to the house, do we need a vented attic or will it cause more problems than it solve? I have printed out your article and the blogs to give to my contractors and architect, but I would really appreciate your comments on the products being used in my part of the US. 
Open-cell is also known as half-pound foam. It has an R-Value of 3.5-3.6 per inch, and its density is bout 0.5 pounds per cubic food. Low-density foams like these are made partially from raw biological materials Carbon dioxide or water is also used in the makeup. Open-cell uses far less material than closed-cell, but its R-Value is lower. Also, open cell requires a vapor retarder (like gypsum wallboard) and is riskier when used for roof sheathing. It's not highly recommended that you use open-cell insulation if you live in a cold climate unless you have that extra barrier. You should also compare how much money you spend versus how effective the open-cell insulation is wherever it's installed. 

How Much To Charge For Spray Foam Insulation


Spray foam insulation works by sealing the building envelope to stop conditioned air from escaping and prevent unwanted outside air from entering your home. It allows efficient use of your HVAC system and helps regulate the temperature fluctuations and humidity in your home. It's a lightweight, durable, and versatile insulation solution boasting the industry’s strongest performance in energy efficiency and energy cost savings.
In the early days of insulating attics, people believed the insulation was a heat source. That’s not the case, as the insulation is actually a barrier between two areas of different temperatures. As for the “hot roof” theory, the unvented attic system could make the temperature of the roof go up a little, but this increase won’t cause damage to your shingles. https://youtube.com/v/ggLAUsiuI_o?version=3

R-value is the term given to thermal resistance to heat flow. The higher the R-value of an insulation product, the more effective the insulation properties. Spray polyurethane foam comes in a range of densities and cel structure. Low density foams are referred to as Open Cel SPF while higher density foams are referred to as Closed Cel foam. 1.8-2 pound polyurethane foam has the highest R-value of readily available spray foam insulation used in homes and buildings.[4]


This depends on the geographic location, insulation, and cost of electricity. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA), and several roofing material manufacturers have computer programs that can estimate the savings. A growing number of energy consultants are available to provide environmental regulation compliance information.
Part of that guidance will be explaining that interior, two component foam is applied with the professional using specific personal protective equipment (high-pressure foam is installed while using a respirator, for example). It is encouraged that professionals explain clearly to customers that this equipment, coupled with certain work and engineering practices, including ventilation, is used to minimize exposures to the chemicals used to make SPF during the job.
I don't even want to ask this question but... several years ago we hired a local contractor to spray high density foam on the roof deck and walls of our unfinished 2nd floor. We realized that the job was done poorly and cut an access into the attic space to assess things. We realize now that they spray foamed directly to the chimney (no flashing). The chimney is currently used for a woodstove and DHW venting. The DHW will go away but wood stove will remain. My question is, how bad (unsafe) is this? I have found information on foam exposure to fire but have not been able to find anything about temperature ratings in general (i.e. what happens on prolonged exposure to high temperatures).

Porch urns are an excellent way to add seasonal curbside flair. However, tall items such as twigs, birch stems or even pumpkins can sway in the breeze and make a mess of your carefully planned decor. To prevent things from shifting, place your items in the container and spray around them with expanding foam to create a comfy nest that will keep your urns looking great. Place a layer of moss, hay or greenery on top to finish the look.


When it comes to insulating the house, fiberglass tends to be the common form of insulation. However, after comparing fiberglass and spray foam insulation, it’s shocking how fiberglass tends to be the lesser of the two. Although it has deemed reliable over the years, there are way more benefits to insulating your home with spray foam. One of those benefits includes regulating the temperature of your house.

For exterior commercial concrete walls or cavity walls, seams and gaps can be a problem. Our continuous InsulBloc® seamless spray foam insulation system is a highly versatile, closed-cell foam that exhibits outstanding air barrier and moisture barrier qualities. Because InsulBloc® is a spray application, it will conform to any geometric shape. This affords architects infinite design freedom since this spray foam insulation product will adhere to any creative feature or curve that your building might have, and seal irregular shapes such as steel I-beams, corrugated roof decks, and dissimilar construction material interfaces.

How Much Is Closed Cell Spray Foam


Air infiltration and exfiltration within a home contributes to almost 99% of moisture migration. Restricting air movement stops moisture accumulation so that the possibility of mold growth is less likely. Combined with a properly sized HVAC system, spray foam insulation helps control the indoor humidity levels to minimize moisture and condensation. Reducing moisture and controlling humidity can also add years to the life expectancy of a home, plus contribute to a healthier indoor environment. Finally, it also deters pests, making it difficult for them to nest. http://youtu.be/ggLAUsiuI_o
Apply coating when the roof is dry and the sealant has set. You will be using a 9-inch heavy-duty frame, ½-inch paint roller for spreading coating on roof or 1-1/4-inch roller for dipping in pail, and a 5–to-6-foot extension pole. Use a 3/4-inch roller with basecoats and emulsions. Map out your roof and make each pail fill that area. See Elastek Product Sheets for recommended coverage. An inexpensive 3-inch or 4-inch brush should be used to reach areas not possible with a roller. Use a stiff paintbrush for applying 103 Crack & Joint Sealant. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o

I don't know if it's common or uncommon, but installing a layer of rigid foam above your roof sheathing in order to interrupt thermal bridging is always a good idea, and is preferable in all respects to a roof assembly without any rigid foam above the sheathing. If you decide to install rigid foam above the roof sheathing, you shouldn't use closed-cell spray foam under the sheathing; either use open-cell spray foam (which is vapor-permeable) or a fluffy insulation like cellulose, mineral wool, or fiberglass (any of which will allow the roof sheathing to dry to the interior).
Air infiltration and exfiltration within a home contributes to almost 99% of moisture migration. Restricting air movement stops moisture accumulation so that the possibility of mold growth is less likely. Combined with a properly sized HVAC system, spray foam insulation helps control the indoor humidity levels to minimize moisture and condensation. Reducing moisture and controlling humidity can also add years to the life expectancy of a home, plus contribute to a healthier indoor environment. Finally, it also deters pests, making it difficult for them to nest. http://youtu.be/ggLAUsiuI_o
If you’re not familiar, spray foam is a type of insulation that expands after you spray. The foam expands and seals, avoiding any type of unnecessary moisture (which can create mold) or encouraging pests to eat through your walls. It protects the lining of your house, and even can protect the heating and cooling of your house during those unbearably cold or hot days.
I employed a company to insulate my three story house in 2011. They started Insulating it in August of 2011...They said it would be a 3-4 day job. They installed it in 0.5"-8" lifts all in the same cavity, this left burned insulation and voids. They removed what they told me was the bad insulation and in the process cut many electrical wires. They fixed this. They then reinstalled too thick again in some spots and removed again. They then installed it for a 3rd time. The areas that I thought were good are now separating from the structural members leaving voids. As of October 2012, 1 year and 2 months of dealing with the contractor I told them I want proof that what has been installed carries a warranty or I want my money back and I will fix the problems myself. They have yet to provide me with this warranty. I have spent many hours in the house looking at what is bad and they need to fix. I am frustrated, 14 months of additional rent due to their negligence. I would like to know how I can get proof that the product carries the manufacturers lifetime warranty, or has it been installed improperly throughout the entire house. Desperately awaiting your response. 
I'm in the process of redoing my basement and read through the posts. I took out one inch styrofoam covered by 1/4 " beadboard and installed 2X4s and plan on putting in fiberglass batts between them(r-13) with 1/2 in drywall over top of that. Do you think I will see a significat increase in heat control? Should I have done more?... it's a little after the fact, but still curious to know if I will see a big difference based on your experience.

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